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BRAVE NEW FILMS – In The Media



Mayor Garcetti Praises Healing Trauma


This City Came Up With a Simple Solution to Homelessness: Housing

posted on Truthout.org: 

Kilee Lowe was sitting in a park when cops picked her up and booked her into jail overnight.

After she got out the next morning, she returned to the park. The same officer who had thrown her into a cell not twenty-four hours before booked her again. It was back to jail for Kilee.

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The Truth About the War of Drones

by Joyce Gonzoles Perez for 80 Grados:

About 98% of people who have died from so-called "drone attacks" are not civilian "targets" or high-value targets, but harmless. This is one of the data revealing documentary follows Unmanned: America Drone Wars (2013), which investigates the impact of these drone attacks, but are operated remotely by operators. The audiovisual project questions the foreign policy of the United States, through interviews ranging from the testimony of a drone operator and arguments of military officers, to the experiences of families of the victims and analysis of investigative journalists. - See more at: http://www.80grados.net/la-verdad-sobre-la-guerra-de-los-drones/#sthash.qeetxSwf.dpuf

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Leadership Starts with Us

by JSegal Daily Kos:

When the people lead the leaders will follow! Don't wait for a savior or organization to spring up and lead you.

People must organize ourselves, and unite for the greater good of the nation and in fact our world. WE are not alone!~ But we must start alone by ourselves where we are.

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Organizations to Congress: Quit Playing Politics and Deal to Prevent Iran War

posted Press Release from NIAC (National Iranian American Council) for Payvand Iran News

Washington, DC - The National Iranian American Council (NIAC) was one of 37 organizations to send a letter to Congress today regarding the roles of Congress and the President in sealing a nuclear deal with Iran. The letter was prompted when certain lawmakers reacted harshly to a New York Times report that, if there is a nuclear deal with Iran, the White House plans to initially use executive action to temporarily suspend certain sanctions.

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Can a ‘Homeless Bill of Rights’ End the Criminalization of LA’s Most Vulnerable Residents?

by John Thomason for The Nation:

“We are human beings who live here,” Silvia Hernández says emphatically.

She is speaking of Los Angeles’s notorious Skid Row, though she no longer lives there herself. Hernández doesn’t look back fondly on the year she spent nights alternating between streets and shelters, but she appreciates what she believes is a strong sense of community among neighborhood residents. “Now with this new idea of gentrification, they want to take it away,” she says of the business interests and developers remaking downtown, and the police and security officers who are doing their bidding. “They don’t recognize the community as a community.”

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Police Learn to Honor Mentally Ill Human Rights, Ending Excessive Force, Jail`

by Deborah Dupre for The Examiner:

Police have been using excessive force on mentally ill Americans and victims have become justifiably terrified they will be next to experience this human rights abuse that has turned into a $9 billion prison racket. One state, however, is implementing a new way to manage this abuse, according to news reports on Wednesday and Brave New Films has documented the disturbing old police ways as well as hopeful new results of police crisis intervention training.

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This City Came Up With a Simple Solution to Homelessness: Housing

By Kara Dansky for The Nation:

 

Kilee Lowe was sitting in a park when cops picked her up and booked her into jail overnight.

After she got out the next morning, she returned to the park. The same officer who had thrown her into a cell not twenty-four hours before booked her again. It was back to jail for Kilee.

Kilee has been cycling in and out of the criminal justice system for years. After three and a half years in prison, she’s been homeless for a little over a year now.

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Help, Not Incarceration

by Annie Wu for The Epoch Times:

NEW YORK—Anthony Cruz is a different man now that he has been locked up several times. 

Before serving his 10-year sentence in New York state prisons for manslaughter in the first degree he was diagnosed with adjustment disorder and depression, among other mental health conditions. Cruz spent a total of three years in solitary confinement, but he said he was denied help from mental health staff in prison. Unless he had suicidal thoughts, he wasn’t allowed to talk to a psychiatrist. 

 

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Why Does the US Rely on Prisons as the Main Treatment for the Mentally Ill?

by Michael Ham for Later On:  

Brave New Films has a series Over-Criminalized, the first part of which is a look at defining mental illness as a crime worthy of prison time. Another film in the series looks at how homelessness is also a crime in much of the US. It’s as if the state and federal government and policymakers, have decided that the police are best equipped to deal with social problems, by locking people away, much as in international affairs the US relies mostly on its military to deal with the challenges of international relations. If your primary reflex is armed response, every problem looks like an enemy and every approach to solving it is treated as a war.

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Why do Politicians spend $9 billion a year to Jail the Mentally Ill?

by Juan Cole for Informed comment:

“Instead of helping the mentally ill, police often put them behind bars. Watch how one police department is making a positive difference.

It’s simple. Diversion programs work better than incarceration – for everyone. In cities like Seattle, San Antonio, and Salt Lake City, we see that successful solutions are a viable option to help end serious social problems. These services alter the course of people’s lives in a positive way and save taxpayers huge amounts of money. We cannot continue to isolate and imprison people who suffer from mental illness, substance abuse, or homelessness. We must treat them with compassion and care to better serve our communities and our pocketbooks.

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